Tag Archives: Opinion

The Problems with the 93rd Academy Awards

By Angelica Moreno

The 93rd Academy Awards show, ‘The Oscars,’ took place on Sunday, April 25. Now that we have our story’s basics aside, there are some things I’d like to say about this year’s Oscar winners.

I am a ‘quickly fixated’ and ‘prone to micro obsessions’ type of person. Once I like something, I love it and when I hate something, I just hate it. So when I got the final and complete list of Oscar winners, I was taken back. Why didn’t any of my favorite movies get awarded?

The movies I hoped to get awarded were: The Trial of the Chicago 7, Promising Young Woman and (shamefully mumbles under her breath) Borat Subsequent Moviefilm. An odd trio, but I’m not at my peak of pretentiousness to have picked the other movies to love, yet. I waited 364 days for this very award show and didn’t get exactly what I wanted. Wow; just wow. It’s like they don’t even know that I exist– because they don’t.

After a few minutes of sitting on this year’s winner list, (because I keep my phone in my back pocket) it all made sense why each movie got the award they got. All respect to The Trial of the Chicago 7 (below), but I guess they had their field day at The Golden Globes. You’ll get them next time, Aaron Sorkin.

Our most hated winner of the night was Anthony Hopkins for best actor in The Father (below). I didn’t hate it initially but the manipulative buildup of the show to have the viewers and audience think the late Chadwick Boseman would win for the big bang of an outro (and that did not happen), did rile some people up. To be fair, the director of the Academy Awards broadcast, Steven Soderbergh, came out to say he did not know who would win. He just directs the show to go smoothly, and that’s all. He made the personal choice to switch best actor to be last announced in case of Chadwick Boseman winning. You are absolved of your sin, Steven Soderbergh, but only from me personally. You made a lot of people mad.

Movie of the night Nomadland won major categories including best picture, best actress, and best director (pictured below). It is an Oscar-worthy movie but was it even a great movie? The Academy, people who vote for the winners, would go on the route to choose this. It has everything a pretentious person needs–minutes of no dialogue and taking in the environment, substantial acting for the part, only three good lines of dialogue that are #deep. Even with a lesson at the end of every movie, pretentious films feel like they barely had a lesson. It’s not pretentious enough, if I knew what it was about. Maybe I’m confusing pretentious with arthouse but they’re in the same ballpark.

There are many factors as to why Nomadland was the ‘movie of the night,’ but the part that strikes me dirty is the uplift and spotlight that Amazon Prime received. Jeff Bezos got free promotion in best picture Nomadland and that just makes me think someone high ranking in the Academy got paid to skew the votes to promote capitalist propaganda to us. Nomadland dashingly enlightened the idea of Amazon being a good thing in society (as if Jeff Bezos has created the perfect working environment and the gap between us and the top 1% isnt getting bigger by the day). All respect to Nomadland though–with art comes capitalism planted propaganda.

With the pandemic, not every movie got to be made and or released but every other category of the award show gave me the reaction of “Eh, that makes sense.” A big win for Promising Young Woman (original screenplay) that didn’t get recognition all award season other than many nominees and Minari (actress in supporting role) for bringing new talent into the spotlight (pictured below).

Daniel Kaluuya and Lakeith Stanfield from Judas and the Black Messiah (pictured below) continue to go under-appreciated for their talents but their time will come. The film was nominated for best picture and best supporting actor, but did win best original song.

That’s all I want to say about this year’s Oscars with the lesson being: always be cautious of the media you digest because sometimes it just might be American-powered propaganda.

Should colleges require students to be vaccinated?

By Monse Juarez

The decision has been made by several colleges and universities across the country: students will be required to get the Covid-19 vaccine. Some exemptions from this requirement include religious and medical reasons. Aside from the exemptions, there has been pushback by Republicans and even from parents of students. However, the majority of students have not tried to fight the decision at which colleges have arrived. It is clear that different groups have formed their own opinions about the Covid-19 vaccine, however the real question is: Should colleges require students to be vaccinated?

To answer this question, society must first consider if it is actually legal for colleges to set this requirement. According to Harvard Law Professor, Glenn Cohen, colleges aren’t exactly breaking any laws. On the other hand, there aren’t any laws that explicitly say it is allowed. The Covid-19 vaccination roll-out for college students has been controversial for this very reason. The law doesn’t explicitly forbid or allow college institutions from setting vaccination requirements. In reality, the pushback comes from individual states that have decided to ban Covid-19 regulations like masks and vaccinations.

Clearly, Covid-19 vaccinations are needed to make sure that people are safe. So in reality the Covid-19 vaccination requirement that has been implemented by several colleges across the country, is not exactly illegal. Some colleges already require that students receive flu shots, and all public schools require vaccinations for things like MMR and chickenpox. So the Covid-19 vaccination requirement is actually not as far-fetched as some may believe.

Asian-American Hate Crimes a Step Backward

By Edmund Shryock

As the pandemic ruined summer plans and normal schedules, for some people it fueled a hate against Asain-Americans causing violence to spring up around the country. This is a major step back from the progress that Americans made in breaking down the racial barriers in the last 60 years. 

After the attacks on Pearl Harbor in 1941, America declared war on Japan, officially entering the United States in WWII. However, war with Japan created hatred towards Asian-Americans as the U.S population believed that they were spies. This led to President Roosevelt signing into action Executive Order 9066 which forced hundreds of Japanese-Americans to be sent to internment camps even though most were American Citizens. 

In 2020 the whole world came to a stop due to the Coronavirus Pandemic. As scientists tracked the location to where the pandemic started, they found out that it originated from China. This gave birth to conspiracy theories on how the virus started causing numerous Americans to have anger towards Asian-Americans believing they were the main cause. These tensions were only escalated when then-President Donald Trump would use terms such as the “Kung Flu” and “China virus” when referencing the Coronavirus.

Now with Joe Biden as President, he has now faced the issue of Asian-American hate spreading across the country. Los Angeles Times staff writer Leila Miller reported that, “The Los Angeles Police Department documented 15 hate crimes against Asian Americans in 2020, more than double the previous year, according to a new study by the agency.” This goes to show the destruction caused by hatred and stupidity. (picture via)

In my opinion, I believe that the only way to stop the racial hate and unite this country is to educate each other and actually discuss our differences. American musician Daryl Davis put it best in my opinion: “There’s a difference between being ignorant and being stupid… For me, an ignorant person is someone who makes the wrong decision or a bad choice because he or she does not have the proper facts. If you give that person the facts and the proper information you have alleviated that ignorance, and they make the right decision.” Through this education process we can unite and look past race and skin color as a whole, making the world safer for generations to come.

Opinion: Elementary Schools are Reopening

By Evelyn Aquino

Starting this Monday, March 29, preschool through 2nd grade students in the Norwalk-La Mirada Unified School District returned back to campus for in-person learning on a hybrid learning schedule. 3rd to 5th grade students are expected to be back after spring break on Monday, April 12, 2021. Parents were given the option to either return their kids back to in-person school or continue digitally online.

In my opinion, schools should not reopen yet; instead, they should focus on how to improve for the following school year instead of possibly putting kids at risk of getting the virus right now. If one person–either a student, teacher, or staff member–got the virus, they would have to close again or send multiple people into quarantine, which could possibly lead to kids falling behind once again. It will also take time for students to adjust to the sudden change of going from online to in-person, and there are fewer than 40 days of school left.

Although young kids are less likely to transmit the virus, it is still important that the schools continue following safety precautions. They should still be 6 feet away from each other while wearing masks, and teachers and custodians should clean any surfaces that the students would most likely touch, such as the door handles, desks, books, and any electronic devices.

It was believed that many parents didn’t want their children to return to school when cases were at the peak. Now, around 50% of parents want their children to return to school since cases are decreasing and L.A. County is slowly reopening since it approached the red tier. Opening schools in general was something that wasn’t settled knowing the risks of getting the virus. Reopening elementary schools was the first approach because they only stay in one room all day.

Young kids will most likely have difficulties following the same precautions an adult has to follow. It is also a concern for kids with special needs. Most might be capable of following safety protocols, but others might not.

It might be better if schools didn’t reopen for the rest of the school year; but the opening has begun, and now we wait and see how things go.

Opinion: Biden Is A Much Needed Change

By Daisy Penaloza

The Drama is Ending

America has suffered for the last four years because of the horrendous acts of former president Trump. Trump never behaved as a president should behave–putting his country and its people first–and this was as clearly seen not only by our own country’s citizens, but by the entire world.

Trump never once did anything to save or to really help the country as a whole, but he’s surely done much to help himself and his own personal political agenda.

From deeming different groups of people as “criminals, terrorists, rapists, drug dealers,” plummeting the economy like never before, and knowing the dangers of COVID-19 yet letting it worsen, Trump made his mark as the worst president ever.

Additionally, as a result of the Trump-incited insurrection that took place on January 6 and the resulting death threats to both President Joe Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris, the U.S. placed 25,000 National Guard troops and Secret Service, as well as other law enforcement personnel around them at the U.S. Capitol in order to ensure the safety and security of all involved on Inauguration Day.

Hope for the Future

Now that President Biden has taken office, Americans can breathe a sigh of relief as they finally have hope for a brighter and calmer future. 

President Biden receives the Covid-19 vaccine

Life still won’t be easy, and as always, it will get tough at times. But, with the help of the new president and his cabinet, our country may finally receive what it needs–unity.

Biden and Harris will have tons of work to do working to rebuild everything the previous president ruined, but it is a challenge that they both are eager to take on.

President Joe Biden has proposed some wondrous and amazing policies. First, he promised to get the raging pandemic under control. He is making public announcements asking Americans to wear masks and take precautions, and he is working to obtain vaccines and distribute them as quickly as possible. He also wants to work towards more ways to reduce climate change, empower and protect women, and even advance LGBTQ+ equality!

Even though our leadership has finally changed, this is not the time for complacency. 

The fight for our rights is over when the need for a fight is over.

For more information on President Biden’s plans and policies, check out his official campaign website.

Opinion: Senior Year 2021

by Joceline Rodriguez 

Senior year. It’s said to be one of the best years of high school. Normally, there are so many fun activities and events to enjoy with your friends as school is coming to an end. It’s one time in our lives that we’ll never be able to experience again.

Although most teens would agree that school sucks, and it is not very fun, what IS amazing is how we meet new people and develop new friendships. School has its ups and downs for sure,  but it’s honestly a great experience–with the right people.

Before COVID, everyone would always complain about going to school, and they talked about how much they would prefer to do school online instead of dragging themselves half-asleep to campus every day.

But now, after a year of “learning” at home,  I know many kids and adults who would jump at the chance to return to campus right now instead of doing classes via Zoom and Schoology all day every day alone and in isolation.

At first it was not bad. In fact, it was kind of fun–a novelty.  But the newness has quickly worn down like an over-sharpened pencil.

Last year, the class of 2020 suffered major disappointments. They didn’t get to have the full senior experience with prom, activities, and graduation. On campus life was cut short–right at the most exciting part of the year.

Graduates couldn’t walk the stage in person with their friends.  Families couldn’t sit in the crowd and cheered them on. Instead, all everyone got was just a video of all the seniors’ pictures on a TV screen.

However, this years’ seniors have it worse. We didn’t even get to step foot on campus for one day of our senior year! And it sucks knowing that we probably won’t be having graduation in person either.

We’re all wishing for things to get better. We’re all hoping that the vaccine will allow us to actually graduate live and in person. We’re all at home waiting.

But, no matter what happens, we can finally see a light at the end of the dark and lonely tunnel. Eventually everything will go back to normal.

Maybe the class of 2022 will be able to experience the whole traditional senior year thing complete with dances, homecoming, prom, grad night, and an actual graduation.

If they do, I hope they truly appreciate it.

Capitol Riot: Student Voices Ring Out

By Daisy Penaloza

Rattling Insurrection

The events that took place on Wednesday, January 6, 2021 at our nation’s Capitol Building have rattled everyone, including cadets and students at Southeast Academy and JGHS. 

Students in Shock

Many cadets watched in disbelief as events unfolded. Daniel Ramos, a junior at SEA, shares his impressions: “I feel ashamed [of] the people who made a fool of our country and [of] themselves.” Similarly, JGHS senior Joseph Nunez laments, “It is ridiculous and disgusting that these people with privilege are doing an act of domestic terrorism on our country.”

Our very democracy was challenged by these rioters, and students are questioning the motives behind it. “Why would they disrespect their country’s symbol of a democratic government?” asks Cpl. Sarah Shim. An article in the Washington Post attempts to answer that question. Trump lost the election, yet he convinced his supporters that it was “stolen” from them. President Trump further encouraged followers to go to the Capitol to intimidate Congress and stop the certification of the electoral college votes. This dangerous rhetoric is what instigated these heinous actions. 

The United States is a country at war with itself, and this civil unrest will have long lasting ramifications. Senior 1st Lt. Nieto believes that our current leaders share much of the blame because not “all politicians” have a positive influence on their followers. Additionally, she states that, “Opposing political views not only have an impact on an individual, but [also on] all of society.”

All eyes are upon our nation. Since we as a country have wreaked “havoc” on ourselves, observes 1st Lt. Kushal Tavva, this insurrection has, “turned us into the laughing stock of the world.” SEA Journalism staff editor and reporter Ace Castro adds to this sentiment, stating, “Not only are our enemies laughing at us, but our allies might… be embarrassed to be ASSOCIATED with us!” 

Students Call Out Inequity

The sharp inequity between how these mostly white rioters were treated as opposed to the treatment inflicted upon the protesters of color during the Black Lives Matter movement last summer did not go unnoticed by students. 

Sophomore Paul Vargas noted that, had this been a BLM riot, “They would have armed guards and armor around the Capitol.” JGHS senior Kaitlyn M. agrees. The BLM protesters were calling for “basic human rights,” yet they were met with armed guards in “riot gear.”

Jon Schuppe of NBC News noted that while some police officers did try to deal with the insurrectionists, “Others took selfies and appeared to offer no resistance, allowing dozens of rioters to leave without being arrested.”

Alternative Opinion

But not all students see it this way. At least one student believes that the difference in police response has more to do with the fact that the authorities learned a valuable lesson about using excessive force and less to do with discrimination or white privilege. Cadet Eric Rodrigueza explains, “I believe that the reasoning for [police] lack of action against the protesters/rioters is that they were trying to prevent what had happened before.” Rodrigueza adds, “I truly believe this is the reason why [the police] choose to let the protesters/rioters enter the U.S Capitol.” 

No matter where we stand politically, I hope we can all agree that what happened at the Capitol Building on Jan. 6th was wrong.

Student Reactions

Click here to see more student reactions to this historic event.

Black History = American Heroes

By Angelica Moreno

The Shoemaker Bugle honors Black History Month with profiles of these 12 American heroes.

Martin Luther King, Jr.

Born on January 15, 1929, Dr. King’s goal was to relieve America of its racist values and bring unity among the races. He was the leader of the Civil Rights movement and fond of peaceful protest. The face and voice of human rights gained  national recognition with the Montgomery Bus Boycott after Rosa Parks declined to give up her seat in a time of segregation. After 381 days of protest, the Supreme Court ruled segregation on buses was unconstitutional, and that paved the way for the Civil Rights Movement to expand with high respectability being generated toward Dr. King. Everyone believed in him and peaceful protest to progress history. Most notably known for his “I Have a Dream Speech” on August 28, 1963, as more than 250,000 people listened, King got to deliver his speech from the steps of the Lincoln memorial for all of America, even his enemies.

“I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. I have a dream today.”

-Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Bayard Rustin

Born on March 17, 1912, American leader Rustin was a popular protest organizer for social movements. Starting in his teens, he began to peacefully protest racial segregation. From there on, he would organize protests for movements anywhere he went. In its first breaths of the Civil Rights movement, in 1954, Rustin became Dr. King’s chief organizer and went onto organize the March on Washington a decade later, in 1963, which included King’s famous “I Have a dream” speech. His homosexuality was off-putting to leaders of the movement, so he didn’t get recognized for his actions until later in his life. 50 years after the Civil Rights movement, President Obama awarded him the presidential award of freedom which praised Rustin’s determination towards true equality.

“We need, in every community, a group of angelic troublemakers.”

-Bayard Rustin

Malcolm X

Born May 19, 1925, American-Muslim minister and human rights activist Malcolm X is one of the most notable symbols of black liberation in modern history. With his extremely powerful words on racial issues, he was a hard-hitter with his speech and actions, differing in his views of peaceful protest from MLK. One of America’s biggest threats during his prime of activism, he cultivated a global following. His “less-than-appropriate” manner of speech came from anger about discrimination and inequality. So for all those too scared to speak like him would be his supporters.

“The injustice that has been inflicted on negroes in this country by Uncle Sam is criminal. The government is responsible for the injustice. The government can bring these injustices to halt.”

-Malcolm X, referring to police brutality

Frederick Douglass

Born around 1818, American leader of the abolitionist movement and writer Douglass was a highly famous intellectual of his time that sought to abolish slavery. A self-freed slave, he never knew his age (as all enslaved were mostly never told of their birthday and/or maiden name to be kept ignorant of their own nature and being). On one of the many plantations he was on as a child, a slave owner’s wife took to him and taught him how to read. He was beaten for knowing how to read but gained more knowledge on his own. Then he went on to write books about his struggle and gained popularity. He would give speeches while traveling around the country and even was one of the key consultants who convinced Lincoln to abolish slavery in effort to support the civil war with more troops.

“If there is no struggle, there is no progress.”

-Frederick Douglass

Harriet Tubman

Born in the early 1820’s as “Araminta Ross,” Tubman was an American abolitionist. She freed over 300 people from slavery in the 1850’s realizing that slavery occurring anywhere in America was uncalled for. This feat in history caused her to move higher with her courage in which she became a Union Army nurse, scout, and spy during the Civil War. From these attributes, she became the first woman in U.S. history to lead a military raid and free enslaved people. Her plans to better the community of black people never stopped, from raising money to building schools and hospitals, to supporting women’s suffrage. Even on her deathbed, this prominent woman in history, continued to be of relief to America’s racism.

“I go to prepare a place for you.”

-Harriet Tubman’s last words

James Baldwin

Born August 2, 1924, Baldwin was an American writer and activist for his people. As a teen, he was a preacher and from that, he was able to develop his writing style; however, because of the limited outlook the church had for racism and the lack of support for homosexuality, he lost interest. In his early twenties, he moved to Paris and began to write his take on racism in America. One of his most famous works, “Notes from a Native Son,” depicted class, race, and sexuality and from that he became an influential prominent black writer, as well as a liaison in the Civil Rights movement. He debated Robert Kennedy, Malcolm X, and many others. With his uncanny ability to get respect from white people in debates and openness of his sexuality (during a time of rampant racism and homophobia), he was seen as a threat to the American government. He was ahead of his time and a path maker for the future.

“I love America more than any other country in this world, and, exactly for this reason, I insist on the right to criticize her perpetually.”

-James Baldwin

Langston Hughes

Born February 1, 1902, Hughes was an American writer, one of many leaders of the Harlem Renaissance, and an early founder of “jazz poetry.” He wanted African-American values intertwined with writing and a new form to be born in “jazz poetry.” Predominantly white people had been in the spotlight for literature since the dawn of reading literature, but Hughes gave poetry a new flow and style. Black representation could now be seen in writing and be shared in his community.

“Good morning daddy, ain’t you heard, the boogie woogie rumble of a dream deferred.”

-an example of Langston Hughes’ jazz poetry

Emmett Till

Born July 25, 1941, Emmett Till was lynched at only fourteen years old for accusations of harassing a white woman. He was brutally beaten to death by two white men who claimed to be defending a white woman from Till. Mamie Till Bradley, mother of Emmett, was so distraught over her son’s death that she needed for the world to see what they had done to her son. By sending pictures of his distorted face to magazines and newspapers, along with a public open-casket funeral, publicity was given to Emmett Till’s murder. In the three-day trail for the murder of Emmett Till, the all-white jury found the killers not guilty. Seven years after its time, one juror confessed that most of the jury did find them guilty but deemed life in prison too harsh on white men for killing a black boy.

“I thought of Emmett Till, and when the bus driver ordered me to move to the back, I just couldn’t move.”

-Rosa Parks on Emmett Till’s impact

Ella Fitzgerald

Born April 25, 1917, American jazz singer, Ella Fitzgerald is known as the first lady of song. Fitzgerald was, and still is, a highly influential part of music history. Having an impeccable voice to make the world swoon with tenderness and admiration, even Marilyn Monroe couldn’t get enough of her. After winning a singing competition at Harlem’s Apollo theater, she got connected with Chick Webb and recorded one of her first songs, “Love and Kisses.” From there on out, she would collaborate with big names in the jazz business like Louis Armstrong, Count Basie, The Ink Spots, and many more, which landed her as a prominent figure in jazz history forever.

“The only thing better than singing is more singing.”

-Ella Fitzgerald

Jackie Robinson

Born January 31, 1919, Robinson, baseball’s Civil Rights leader, was the first African-American to break the color barrier and play Major League Baseball. He made history when he was sent out to the field to play first base for the Brooklyn Dodgers on April 15, 1947. A decade later he helped the Dodgers win their first World Series in 1955 (Brooklyn’s only championship). Even with his impact on cutting segregation out of the major leagues, racism still flowed through the stadiums and games. Having to endure immense bigotry throughout his character, he is a legend to have not have quit on us, history, and the black community. His number 42 is retired throughout all of Major League Baseball.

“A life is not important except in the impact it has on other lives.”

-Jackie Robinson

Ruby Bridges

Born September 8, 1954, six-year-old Bridges made her impact on November 14, 1960, when she was the first African-American child to desegregate an all-white elementary school in New Orleans. In 1954, the Brown v. Board of Education supreme court case ruled that segregation in schools was unconstitutional, but the school still did not comply with the ruling. Finally, a federal order was issued five years later to slowly begin segregation, starting with four black children on their first day of first grade, and Bridges was one of them. U.S. Marshals escorted the girl to school and caused an uproar so badly that almost all students and faculty withdrew their positions in the school. She and the only teacher who would teach her, Barbara Henry, went on to manage the school year alone and Bridges went onto second grade successfully. 

“My message is really that racism has no place in the hearts and minds of our children.”

-Ruby Bridges

Angela Davis

Born January 26, 1944, America leader Davis is a human rights activist, intellectual, and advocate of prison abolition. An icon for once being on the FBI’s most wanted list and facing the death sentence in California, Davis has gone on her whole life fighting for justice of black people and reformation of the criminal justice system. Seen as a threat for leading the prison abolishment movement, she was ruled as “armed and dangerous” by the FBI. After being imprisoned for 18 months for connections to a murder, all her charges were acquitted and now she had an inside look of what is is to be a criminal in America, which encouraged her activism to continue and never stop. She is now a professor at UC Santa Cruz.

“I’m no longer accepting the things I cannot change… I’m changing the things I cannot accept.”

-Angela Davis

Editorial: U.S. Capitol Building Chaos Shameful

By The Shoemaker Bugle

Violent protests by an angry mob of President Trump supporters took place at the Capitol Building in Washington D.C. on Wednesday, leading to a suspension of the official count of the 2020 Electoral College votes by the House and the Senate (pictured, above, protestors clash with police–Julio Cortez/AP).

In the ensuing chaos, a woman was shot and killed while at least five others were taken to the hospital, according to NBC News. The Senate recessed its Electoral College debate after the mob forced a lockdown and Vice President Mike Pence and everybody in the Capitol Building was quickly evacuated.

Lawmakers from the House and Senate were meeting in a joint session on Wednesday to certify electors in the final step ahead of President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration later this month. They did not get very far, breaking for debate when the third state’s envelope–Arizona–came up for certification and discussion.

During the session, news quickly shifted to a mob of Trump supporters, who broke through police barriers and eventually entered the Capitol building, engaging with riot police as Congress held a joint session to count the Electoral College votes which would clear the path to President-elect Joe Biden’s inauguration later this month.


The D.C. Chief of Police declared the event a riot, and the National Guard was brought in just before the 6:00pm EST curfew to clear the area and secure the Capitol Building. After a delay of several hours, Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi planned a return to the Capitol to continue certifying the election results. They assembled again at 8:08pm EST with an opening statement by Vice President Pence, who boldly declared, “We condemn the violence that took place here in the strongest possible terms… Violence never wins. Freedom wins… Let’s get back to work.”

“We will not be intimidated. We not be kept out of this chamber by thugs, mobs, or threats… We will certify the winner of the 2020 Presidential Election. Criminal behavior will never dominate the United States Congress. The American people deserve nothing less.”

Senator Mitch McConnell, in his opening statement after Congress finally re-convened

Senator Charles Schumer (who is soon to be the Majority Leader in the Senate) closed his remarks by adding, “Democracy will triumph as it has for centuries.”

World leaders also reacted in shock to today’s events. America, a beacon of hope and a shining example of democracy around the world, has stunned our allies with today’s actions. In a historic week that also saw Georgia elect two new Democratic Senators, violence and chaos stole the headlines.

The Shoemaker Bugle condemns the violence, chaos, and unprecedented interruption to America’s democratic process. We feel that today’s events are shameful and shocking, and this will be seen as an embarrassing day in American history.


Striking photographs illustrate the extent of the chaos and violence (photos courtesy Getty Images, unless otherwise indicated):

Never before in the United States of America has a Confederate flag appeared in the halls of the U.S. Capitol Building… until Wednesday.


Biden Statement (photo: New York Times)

Former President Barack Obama’s Statement

Statement from former President George W. Bush

In a video that was later removed from YouTube and Twitter, President Trump addressed a mob of his supporters in a new video, calling for ‘peace’ and telling them to ‘go home’ but continued to tout the false narrative that the election was ‘stolen.’ The video is unable to be shared as it has been deleted. Shortly after 7:00pm EST, it was announced that the President’s Twitter account has been locked for at least 12 hours.


note: This editorial represents the sole opinions of the Shoemaker Bugle student staff & editors

My Covid-19 Experience

By An Anonymous Student

On November 15, 2020 I woke up with a sore throat in the morning. I did not know how I got it, especially after not being sick for months. But something was not adding up. During this whole pandemic my family and I were always at home, still leaving us in shock to find that I got Covid.

After the first day, my second symptom was a runny nose which started on Monday. On that day, my nose hurt so bad when I would sneeze, my chest would hurt, and my nose was super red after blowing it with so much tissue. My trash can was full of tissues and that was the most that I have ever filled it up with. I had also lost my taste and smell and those were only Covid symptoms I got, but I would never have thought that it would be that. 

The next day, I went to take a rapid Covid test. When you put the swab in your nose it is super uncomfortable; it didn’t hurt me, however it can hurt others because everyone is different. An hour later, the laboratory called my mom saying that I was positive for Covid-19. I was in shock that I got it and I honestly did not know where I got it from. I was not scared though, because you have to stay strong and keep a positive mindset.

So once I got my results, I ate and then went to my room for the rest of the night and then started my quarantine the next day. My quarantine was hard because I’m not used to being in my room for 14 days and doing nothing but I made the best out of it. I did activities such as painting, playing board games, and vibing to music.

I thank God that we all got mild symptoms and my family members are healed. We are lucky that we did not get as sick because we did not get it as bad as other people have. I am very thankful that we are healed and we all got better. My parents had a trip to go to and they had to cancel it because they did not want to leave us alone while we were supposed to be at home. It was very hard for us, too, because we had to stay home during Thanksgiving, but we made the best out of it.

It was also hard because some of my other family members were also affected with the virus, including my parents. But let me tell you this–if you are affected by the virus, make sure you take a lot of Vitamin C and teas with lemon and honey. These natural home remedies helped me a lot throughout the two weeks that I was home. After one week, my smell started to come back but my taste buds are still not 100% there, but I know it will come back soon.

If you have been affected by Covid-19, please stay home and away from others and quarantine yourself until you start to feel better again. If you think that Covid is not real, it IS, because my family, and I all experienced it firsthand.

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