Tag Archives: movies

Movies to watch before you graduate high school

By Angelica Moreno

I recently came to the realization that once I graduate high school, I will not relate to movies that surround themselves around a high school plot. Yes, you can watch Superbad in your late 20s or whatever but you won’t be able to say, “Oh yeah; I’m in high school just like them.” Only now can you watch these movies before it’s too late to semi relate to them. (I also recommended when to watch them because every movie has a place and time.)

Girl-Centered Movies

The Edge of Seventeen, dir. Kelly Fremon (Hulu premium subscription): Protagonist Nadine’s brother decides to date her best friend; and although that’s a common trope in movies, they make good use of it. It drives the plot of Nadine (Haliee Steinfeld) having no friends or social life because of that relationship. 

When to watch: the year you’re seventeen years of age, or when you “feel” like you have no friends.


Easy A, dir. Will Gluck: Olive, played by Emma Stone, is a nobody, ghost, does not exist to her peers around her at school and an acquaintance begs her to fix his reputation by pretending to sleep with him. People finally notice her and now like the hypothetical bad reputation she’s created for herself. 

When to watch: Junior to senior year, or before you want to do something to make yourself “popular.”


Ladybird, dir. Greta Gerwig (Netflix): Ladybird, played by Saoirse Ronan, is a teen girl whose life you get to experience with her. She doesn’t have the biggest presence in school or feels like she lives in the right house but she is just a teenager living her life. She has big dreams for her future and nothing too big happens, but everything that does happen is just enough. Her love-hate relationship with her mom was finally something that felt real in any movie I’ve seen and her first boyfriend is my favorite character, played by Lucas Hedges (an under-appreciated actor!)

When to watch: Senior year (I’m thinking winter break).


The To-Do List, dir. Maggie Carey (Hulu premium subscription, Amazon Prime: premium subscription, Showtime): Brandy Clark, played by Aubrey Plaza, is a straight-A student who didn’t do anything promiscuous all of her high school career but when she’s graduated, the tables have turned. She decides to “to-do” everything she missed out on, the summer before going to college.

When to watch: The weekend after graduation. 


Boy-Centered Movies

The New Guy, dir. Ed Decter (Hulu premium subscription, Amazon Prime: premium subscription, Starz): Self explanatory. It’s so bad it’s good. Okay that’s harsh but some moments feel so cringe-worthy that they are enough to make you laugh from second-hand embarrassment. It felt like an off brand Disney movie.

When to watch: Any time in high school.


Charlie Bartlett, dir. Jon Poll (Pluto TV, Tubi, Amazon Prime): Charlie, played by the late Anton Yelchin, is a privileged private school white boy who desperately wants to be liked. He gets kicked out of every private school he goes to for doing something “cool” to make people like him, like making fake I.D’s for everyone and now he’s forced to go to public school for the first time. He becomes the public school’s psychiatrist and is able to help the kids while also building bonds with everyone.

When to watch: Any time in high school.


17 Again, dir. Burr Steers (Netflix): You’re watching the wrong Zac Efron movie if you’re not watching this one. Mike O’Donnell (Efron) wishes he were “17 again” and his wish comes true while everyone in his life stays the same age. Mike needs to realize why he chose to stay with his pregnant girlfriend at 17 rather than become a pro basketball player because the burden and regret of not choosing his dreams derive from thinking he chose the wrong life.

When to watch: Summer before senior year.


Rushmore (1998), dir. Wes Anderson: Max Fisher, played by Jason Schwartzman, is a pretentious, passionate, creative boy who has the privilege of a private school’s fine arts department budget. He fails every common, core subject class, but excels at after school extracurricular activities–most of which he started himself. It’s a story-like movie that is quirky and enjoyable.

When to watch: On an uneventful Wednesday night.


Donnie Darko, dir. Richard Kelly (Tubi, Pluto TV, Amazon Prime): Young Jake Gylennhal struck the landing with this one and every movie after; he always makes a movie better. You don’t know whether Donnie is crazy, eccentric, or advantaged to the average person. A demonic rabbit tells him the world is going to end in 28 days and I think Donnie believes it. It felt like it was in the same universe as American Beauty.

When to watch: Any time in high school.


The Dynamic Duo

Back to the Future (1985) dir. Robert Zemeckis (Amazon Prime and Netflix): A must see ‘80’s classic. You need to understand every Marty McFly and Doc Brown reference future media might bring you. It’s actually not self-explanatory because most of the movie is Marty, played by Michael J. Fox, going to the past, which then changes his dad’s future for the better.

When to watch: Any Sunday morning of high school.

Ghost World, dir. Terry Zwigoff (Hulu premium subscription, Amazon Prime: premium subscription, Starz): Your only friend is your best friend and all you do is bully people and make fun of stuff. Enid, played by Thora Birch, and Rebecca, played by Scarlett Johansson, just graduated high school and both are on job hunts to fund the apartment they want to get together. Rebecca sticks to the plan but Enid fans out into a different venture, having to take a summer class and not fully graduating, and creating a new friendship out of her bullying habits.

When to watch: Summer after graduation or any Thursday night.


The Infamous Trio 

Me and Earl and the Dying Girl, dir. Alfonso Gomez-Rejon: Greg, played by Thomas Mann, has no “friends” except his buddy that he hangs out with every day. Greg refers to him as a co-worker because in their free time they like to make short films about the movies they’ve watched. Greg’s mom forces him to hang out with the girl who has cancer; and even though they initially dislike each other, after forcefully hanging out for weeks on end they become friends… there’s no romance in this one (they actually just stay friends the whole time!). As the title suggests, she does die in the end (but that’s not the point so still watch it).

When to watch: Any Monday through Wednesday afternoon when you have free time.


Dope, dir. Rick Famuyiwa: Malcolm, played by Shameik Moore, is a straight-A student with perfect SAT scores and he feels like he’s ruined his life in one night. His backpack is filled with illegal substances as blackmail for dancing with someone’s girlfriend; and now, this boyfriend character dude has a reason to seek out Malcolm and beat him up.

When to watch: Any Monday after school when you have free time.


Ferris Bueller’s Day Off (1986) dir. John Hughes: “Life moves pretty fast. If you don’t stop and look around once in a while, you could miss it.” Everyone loves him but his principal hates him. Ferris, played by Matthew Broderick, decides to skip school one day. Everyone in town learns he’s “sick” and campaigns for Ferris to get better soon but he’s actually out and about living his ditch day to the fullest. From a baseball game to a parade float performance, it’s just enough entertainment to take in. Cameron’s character, played by Alan Ruck, is my favorite in the movie.

When to watch: Any Saturday morning.


Superbad, dir. Greg Mottola (Netflix): “I am McLovin”

Hopefully you’ve seen it already, but if not, it’s a 2000’s must-see classic. Jonah Hill, Michael Cera, and the other dude (Christopher Mintz-Plasse) are simply trying to get beer to Julie’s party (played by Emma Stone). The world is against them but it might be for good reason because it’s an awesome movie by the end.

When to watch: Any Friday night.


Group Movies 

The Virgin Suicides (1999) dir. Sofia Coppola (Pluto TV, Amazon Prime: premium subscription): The Lisbon girls live in a strict household where their rebellious nature only causes more harm than good. The boys on their block never get to be close to them but they daydream of being with the Lisbon girls, as friends, as boyfriends, as someone they would talk to. The title itself is revealing. Also, what a great soundtrack.

When to watch: On an uneventful Saturday night.


Detroit Rock City (1999), dir. Adam Rifkin (Tubi): A friend-group of four have undying love for the band Kiss. They get tickets to the upcoming Kiss concert but one of their moms finds the tickets and burns them because she thinks Kiss is against Christian values. The group still goes to the concert because nothing stands against them and their idols, even without proof of entry.

When to watch: Any Sunday night. 


Breaking Away (1979), dir. Peter Yates: Dave thinks he’s Italian and wants to be in competitive bicycle racing, dreaming of one day being in the “Tour de France.” In reality, he’s American and lives in Bloomington, Indiana. He trains every day and with the support of his friend group, his dream doesn’t die.

When to watch: On an uneventful Sunday.


TV Shows 

Freaks and Geeks, 1999 (Hulu premium subscription): Many big names who got their first big part are featured here like James Franco, Seth Rogen, Jason Segal, and Busy Phillips. There’s a lot of small cameos from young actors who also got big. A very high school show (teens being teens doing teen things). There’s a relatable aspect you’ll attach to no matter who you are.

When to watch: Any time in high school.


Sex Education (Netflix): Finally characters who aren’t bland and have life to them as a whole person in a show about teenagers. Who knew what good writing could do for a show? A show for everyone; you can’t hate it. I’m serious–you can’t hate it.

When to watch: Junior year.


The End of the F***ing World (Netflix): James, played by Alex Lawther, thinks he’s a psychopath from not feeling emotions his whole life, and Alyssa, played by Jessica Barden, wants to live a different life (one where she doesn’t live with her weird stepdad). They make a pact to run away together to find Alyssa’s dad. Someone kills someone and the story unravels itself on two teenagers not knowing what to do but Alyssa’s confidence leads the way.

When to watch: Any time in high school.

The Problems with the 93rd Academy Awards

By Angelica Moreno

The 93rd Academy Awards show, ‘The Oscars,’ took place on Sunday, April 25. Now that we have our story’s basics aside, there are some things I’d like to say about this year’s Oscar winners.

I am a ‘quickly fixated’ and ‘prone to micro obsessions’ type of person. Once I like something, I love it and when I hate something, I just hate it. So when I got the final and complete list of Oscar winners, I was taken back. Why didn’t any of my favorite movies get awarded?

The movies I hoped to get awarded were: The Trial of the Chicago 7, Promising Young Woman and (shamefully mumbles under her breath) Borat Subsequent Moviefilm. An odd trio, but I’m not at my peak of pretentiousness to have picked the other movies to love, yet. I waited 364 days for this very award show and didn’t get exactly what I wanted. Wow; just wow. It’s like they don’t even know that I exist– because they don’t.

After a few minutes of sitting on this year’s winner list, (because I keep my phone in my back pocket) it all made sense why each movie got the award they got. All respect to The Trial of the Chicago 7 (below), but I guess they had their field day at The Golden Globes. You’ll get them next time, Aaron Sorkin.

Our most hated winner of the night was Anthony Hopkins for best actor in The Father (below). I didn’t hate it initially but the manipulative buildup of the show to have the viewers and audience think the late Chadwick Boseman would win for the big bang of an outro (and that did not happen), did rile some people up. To be fair, the director of the Academy Awards broadcast, Steven Soderbergh, came out to say he did not know who would win. He just directs the show to go smoothly, and that’s all. He made the personal choice to switch best actor to be last announced in case of Chadwick Boseman winning. You are absolved of your sin, Steven Soderbergh, but only from me personally. You made a lot of people mad.

Movie of the night Nomadland won major categories including best picture, best actress, and best director (pictured below). It is an Oscar-worthy movie but was it even a great movie? The Academy, people who vote for the winners, would go on the route to choose this. It has everything a pretentious person needs–minutes of no dialogue and taking in the environment, substantial acting for the part, only three good lines of dialogue that are #deep. Even with a lesson at the end of every movie, pretentious films feel like they barely had a lesson. It’s not pretentious enough, if I knew what it was about. Maybe I’m confusing pretentious with arthouse but they’re in the same ballpark.

There are many factors as to why Nomadland was the ‘movie of the night,’ but the part that strikes me dirty is the uplift and spotlight that Amazon Prime received. Jeff Bezos got free promotion in best picture Nomadland and that just makes me think someone high ranking in the Academy got paid to skew the votes to promote capitalist propaganda to us. Nomadland dashingly enlightened the idea of Amazon being a good thing in society (as if Jeff Bezos has created the perfect working environment and the gap between us and the top 1% isnt getting bigger by the day). All respect to Nomadland though–with art comes capitalism planted propaganda.

With the pandemic, not every movie got to be made and or released but every other category of the award show gave me the reaction of “Eh, that makes sense.” A big win for Promising Young Woman (original screenplay) that didn’t get recognition all award season other than many nominees and Minari (actress in supporting role) for bringing new talent into the spotlight (pictured below).

Daniel Kaluuya and Lakeith Stanfield from Judas and the Black Messiah (pictured below) continue to go under-appreciated for their talents but their time will come. The film was nominated for best picture and best supporting actor, but did win best original song.

That’s all I want to say about this year’s Oscars with the lesson being: always be cautious of the media you digest because sometimes it just might be American-powered propaganda.

Best Movies & Shows To Watch Over The Summer

By Carter Balbuena

With a lot of time on our hands over the summer and with various streaming services, what better way to spend all of that free time than watching something on TV, your phone, or computer? If you find yourself with nothing to watch, then refer to this list of movies and shows you should give a try even if they don’t seem to be your style of entertainment. There will be alternatives to all if you have a different streaming service.

*CW = Content Warning (forgive me if I miss some)

Nezha (2019)

Available (with purchase) on Netflix, YouTube, Google Play Movies & TV, Vudu, Amazon Prime Video, and Apple TV.

A movie that tells it’s own story about Nezha, a teenage protective deity who protects teenagers and professional drivers. As believed in Chinese mythology, Nezha was carried by his mother for 3 years and 6 months until he was finally born with superhuman strength and ability to speak. To learn more about the deity, visit this website.

The movie starts with a bit of background information that tells us about a Mixed Yuan Bead that is split into 2 beads, a spirit bead and a demon bead. Before being born, Nezha was to receive the spirit bead, but instead was birthed with the demon bead. Having the beads switched, Nezha grew to be feared and was isolated from the rest of the village. After being persuaded by his mother, he seeks to learn how to protect the village in hopes of painting himself in a new light.

Supernatural

Available on TNT; also (with purchase) on Netflix, Hulu, Sling TV, YouTube, Google Play Movies & TV, iTunes, Apple TV, Vudu, Amazon Prime Video.

CW: Violence and language. Following two brothers on a journey to find their father as they meet supernatural creatures along the way, Supernatural starts off with Sam and Dean Winchester who were both trained to become hunters and protect the public from the supernatural. However, Sam wanted to go on his own path and went to college, wanting a normal life away from it all. Unfortunately, Dean shows up to his dorm and tells him that their father has gone missing to which he needs his help. This starts their adventure as  they look for their father in various states and ask those that work with him.

Rango

Available (with purchase) on Netflix, YouTube, Google Play Movies & TV, Vudu, Amazon Prime Video, iTunes, and Apple TV.

After falling out of his owner’s car, Rango, who is a chameleon, is left to adventure on his own which lands him in a desert. He quickly adapts to his new life, but runs into trouble along the way

Black Mirror

Available (with purchase) on Netflix and Amazon Prime Video.

CW: Violence and language. In a world full of high-tech inventions, Black Mirror is a show where each episode is about technology in a dystopian world and its effects. The episodes also include different casts each time.

Soul Eater

Available (with purchase) on Netflix.

Soul Eater is a classic anime that is about three teams that consist of a meister and their weapons that are also humans. Maka Alburn and Soul Evans go on adventures with their friends at the Death Weapons Meister Academy. Black Star, Tsubaki Nakatsukasa, Death the Kid, Patty, and Liz.

The story Behind Falcon and the Winter Soldier

by Arlene Perez

The Marvel Cinematic Universe fanbase is growing due to the popularity of its phenomenal hit miniseries WandaVision. And with the March 19th release of Falcon and the Winter Soldier, newcomers have a lot of catching up to do. 

So, if you’re new to the MCU family, but you want to watch this hot new show because you don’t want to experience FOMO, there are a few things you need to know. So strap on your seatbelt because we’re going for a wild ride back to the 1940s!

How it All Began

Captain America: The First Avenger is the 2011 Marvel hit that explores this American hero’s origin story.

Steve Rogers was a young kid from Brooklyn who had tried enlisting in the army several times because he wanted to do his patriotic duty and help his country defeat the Nazis. But sadly, he kept getting rejected due to his poor physical health and small stature. 

Though he faced rejection over and over again, Steve never gave up. Eventually, his perseverance and determination paid off when he was hand selected by Dr. Abraham Erskine to take part in a very experimental procedure.

I could tell you all about what happened, but I don’t want to ruin the experience for you. Check out this movie before tuning into the new Disney Plus series, or you’ll be lost for sure!

Why Should I Watch the Older Movies? 

Why, you ask? Well, the two main characters in the new series– Sam Wilson (aka Falcon) and Bucky Barnes (aka the Winter Soldier)–are  people that you meet along the MCU journey, and both of them have strong ties to Steve Rogers. 

You meet Bucky in the first Captain America movie, but you don’t meet Sam until the 2014 film Captain America: The Winter Soldier. So if you haven’t watched these films, then you won’t really understand the backstory needed to be able to fully follow the plot and understand the connection between these two guys.

My Suggestion? Watch These Films. 

You should at least watch the Captain America series before grabbing the remote and  going to Disney Plus’ newest series. Here they are: 

  • Captain America: The First Avenger
  • Captain America: Winter Soldier
  • Captain America: Civil War

However, if you have the time, energy, and patience to learn all there is to know about these Marvel heroes, go back and watch all of these incredible movies from the beginning to end so that you can catch up on all that you’ve missed!

Besides, what else do you have to do during Spring Break in this pandemic? So grab some snacks, and let the adventure begin!

Best Romantic Movies for Valentine’s Day

By Angelica Moreno

Even if you’re anti-Valentine’s, movies are still awesome no matter what they’re about. There is always a story to tell and actors trying their best to act. So here are some romantic movies to watch before the month is over.

Before Sunrise (1995), dir. Richard Linklater

With a rating of 100% on Rotten Tomatoes, this movie is a must see. Two strangers meet on a train and decide to spend the day together from the instant connection they feel from one another. They only have just one day to get to know each other because our main character is leaving for America the next day. The heartbreak sticks with you days after watching. It’s been with me for two years. P.S.: It’s also a trilogy, so the two additional movies connected to this one are just as good (Before Sunset-2004 and Before Midnight-2013).

Pride and Prejudice (2005), dir. Joe Wright

The story of enemies turned lovers, but they were in love the whole time and just pretended to hate each other. Innocent, sincere, poetic love is the only way to describe it. You don’t see stuff like this anymore unless you’re reading Shakespeare, but this one you can more easily understand.

About Time (2013), dir. Richard Curtis

Our main character can time travel, and he meets the love of his life. Every time something goes wrong, he can go back and do it over. He learns a life lesson by the end.

When Harry Met Sally (1989), dir. Rob Reiner

A rom-com classic. Almost an enemies-turned-lovers arc but they never had sincere hatred for each other, just dislike. Instead, friends become lovers as Harry and Sally bump into each other several times over the years. They never thought they would date because it was strictly platonic, but something just happens overnight.

Love, Rosie (2014), dir. Christian Ditter

The main characters have been friends since they were teens. They have an accidental kiss and it is never talked about after. Both pretend as if it didn’t happen, but time goes on without confessing their love for one another. Later, the girl gets pregnant–not by the love interest, but she keeps it a secret from him for most of the movie.

Sixteen Candles (1984), dir. John Hughes

She’s sixteen and crushing hard on the popular kid at school. He takes notice and somehow things are never in their favor for them to meet. A cute teen romance and ‘80s classic.

Seeking a Friend for the End of the World (2012), dir. Lorene Scafaria

Just about a week left until the world ends, everyone on earth is living life to the fullest. Ending relationships, drinking to oblivion, and other promiscuous things are going on, and the main character gets dumped. His neighbor brings him three-month-old mail and he discovers he has received a love letter from his high school sweetheart. The neighbor then makes it her last mission on earth to have them meet once more… but there’s another plot twist…

Elizabethtown (2005), dir. Cameron Crowe

Right before Orlando Bloom’s main character hilariously fails at a “suicide attempt,” he gets a call from home that his father is dead. He goes back home to Kentucky to arrange the funeral and meets the love interest on his flight, the flight attendant played by Kirsten Dunst. She’s the quirky, go getting, interesting girl who changes his life. It’s an easy watch. Sort of in the dark and quirky comedy style of 500 Days of Summer, if that helps.

Moonrise Kingdom (2012), dir. Wes Anderson

A cute, young romance. Two preteens run away together because they are in love but are soon found by a search party. Their romance is sweet and innocent.

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008), dir. David Fincher

A peculiar and interesting story based on an F. Scott Fitzgerald short story. Benjamin is born at old age. His bones and body are that of an 80-year-old on the brink of death as a newborn; but as he gets older, his body gets younger as he ages in reverse. He also meets the love of his life at fifty-seven years old but nobody wants them being friends because he looks like an old man. From there, the story unravels itself. Although being last on the list, this one made me cry the hardest and longest (for a good thirty minutes, I believe!).

Film Review: Why Coraline is a Good Movie

by Eliza Rodrigueza

Coraline is about a young girl named Coraline Jones who moves into a house called the Pink Palace. The Pink Palace was originally a single house but was made into an apartment after strange events took place with the previous owners. 

The movie is known for a wide range of reasons. First, it is often considered a scary movie, but this is mostly because it is watched by young children. Some other reasons include the weird character known as The Other Mother, the fact that all of the characters have buttons for eyes,  and the use of a tunnel to this “perfect” world.

The Other Mother is supposed to be this monster or “other being” that leads children to believe that they have another set of parents, and she gives them all their desires and affection they want. However, the children must sew buttons to replace their actual eyes in order to stay there. In reality, the children are trapped and never return home.

Coraline is the only child who was ever able to escape. She did this by trapping The Other Mother in her own world. Through the course of the movie, Coraline learns that nothing is more important than the things she has now, including her own parents.

I also learned that lesson by watching how sad and alone Coraline felt when her parents had been trapped by The Other Mother. I’ve watched this movie many times growing up and it’s still my absolute favorite!

Coraline is a movie that teaches you an important life lesson. If you pay close attention to the characters’ actions and the storyline, it teaches you gratitude and about why you should be grateful for what you have.

While it may seem scary to some, if you watch and try to understand the concept of the storyline, things make more sense, and it becomes much more enjoyable.

Coraline is an amazing movie!

Christmas Movie List

By Angelica Moreno

Maybe you’ve seen all of them or seen one of them, or you’ve been living under a rock if you haven’t seen at least one. Nothing is wrong with a yearly re-watch of holiday movies, especially a Christmas one. So, to get into the Christmas spirit here are some feel good movies to watch in the month of December and yes, these are in “my own” ranking order.

Elf, dir. Jon Favreau (Hulu premium subscription): Will Ferrell is a 6’3″ elf who was abandoned as a child then turned working elf. He goes to New York to find his biological father and meets the beauty, Zooey Deschanel, by chance.

How the Grinch Stole Christmas! (1966) dir. Chuck Jones (dailymotion.com): A classic. How could you go wrong with the Grinch? The other versions are good too (in a newer generation sense) but sometimes the original is timeless.

It’s a Wonderful Life (1946) dir. Frank Capra (Amazon Prime video subscription): A tearjerker (for sensitive people). Good people are good people and usually stay good people unless something leads them to corruption and their lives are on the brink of being ruined. I guess guardian angels only exist in movies to help you make the right choice.

Home Alone (1990) dir. Chris Columbus (Disney Plus): Another classic, in a sense. Young Macaulay Culkin was a certified cool kid in this movie.

The Year Without a Santa Claus (1974) dir. Arthur Rankin Jr and Jules Bass: “I’m Mr. White Christmas. I’m Mr. Snow. I’m Mr. Icicle. I’m Mr. Ten Below.”

A Charlie Brown Christmas (1965) dir. Bill Melendez: Come on now, “Linus and Lucy” by Vince Guaraldi Trio during the dancing sequence is the cutest thing ever.

Mickey’s Once Upon a Christmas (1999) dir. Alex Mann, Bradley Raymond, Jun Falkenstein, Toby Shelton, Bill Speers (Disney Plus): I have to add something Mickey Mouse or else Disney will sue me.

The Nightmare Before Christmas, dir. Henry Selick (Disney Plus): Jack Skellington and the music, duh.

Miracle on 34th Street (1947) dir. George Seaton (Disney plus): Santa Claus is real, believe me.

Noelle, dir. Marc Lawrence (Disney plus): Santa Claus has kids, apparently–Bill Hader and Anna Kendrick. Heavily Christmas themed.

Honorable mentions: 

Phineas and Ferb: season 2 episode 22 and season 3 episode 17

Spongebob Squarepants: season 2 episode 8 

“OOoo, Santa’s coming tonight tonight, Santas coming tonight…”

Best Halloween Movies

By Angelica Moreno and Brianna Lucero

A quarantined Halloween may not sound like the most fun if you have no idea how to spend the night. However, there is more to Halloween than trick-or-treating, passing out candy, or going to an amusement park. Halloween can also be telling scary stories, movies, candy, and having fun even if you are indoors.

Here are thirty-one movies (plus one extra!) to watch on Halloween night:

  • Beetlejuice
  • Children of the Corn
  • The Addams Family (1993)
  • Halloween Town
  • Scary Godmother: Halloween Spooktakular
  • The Nightmare Before Christmas
  • Killer Klowns From Outer Space
  • Frankenweenie
  • Igor 
  • Hocus Pocus
  • Paranorman
  • Coraline
  • Corpse Bride 
  • Edward Scissorhands
  • Casper
  • The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)
  • Nightmare on Elm Street (1984)
  • Insidious
  • Carrie (1976)
  • The Exorcist
  • Silence of the Lambs
  • The Shining
  • It (1990)
  • Halloween (1978)
  • Terrifier
  • Freddy Vs. Jason
  • Scary Movie
  • The Blair Witch Project
  • Scream
  • Jeepers Creepers
  • Ghostbusters 
  • Spongebob Squarepants: Scaredy Pants (Season 1, Episode 26)

We do not support the use of illegal websites to watch anything listed. 😉

Go-To Binge Watching During Covid

by Arlene Perez

Ever since quarantine started due to the Coronavirus, both cadets and students have developed new hobbies such as cooking, art, working out, skating, sports, music, gardening, and some have even gotten jobs. This is really important because while being in quarantine students can’t go out with friends or go out to socialize, so they’ve been keeping sane by binge watching shows and movies.

Let’s start off with shows they’ve been watching throughout the pandemic. So far, the most popular shows include Criminal Minds, The Office, Outer Banks, All American, Shameless, American Horror Story, Grey’s Anatomy, Orange is the New Black, along with many more. 

Popular choices for movies include The Greatest Showman, A Nightmare Before Christmas, Mulan, Central Intelligence, The Notebook, Avengers, The Titanic, and many more.

Now if you’re wondering how they’ve been watching both shows and movies, many cadets and students have been using streaming services like Netflix, Disney+, HBO, Hulu, and Amazon Prime. Due to the ease of streaming, many students have rewatched many shows and movies more than once.

Lastly, here’s a look at some popular snacks consumed while binge watching. Here are the results of a poll I did showing popular snacks for cadets:

  • 30.4% – Candy
  • 26.1% – Popcorn
  • 15.2% – Chips
  • 13% – Chocolate
  • 8.7% – Nachos
  • 4.3% – Ice Cream
  • 2.2% – Fruit

So as you can see, many students and cadets have different snacking preferences when it comes to watching movies or shows.

Mulan Controversy

By Carter Balbuena

Before the live-action Disney movie Mulan was released, there was controversy surrounding it. Some people had their own thoughts and opinions regarding the lead actress. Liu Yifei who plays the title lead, was under fire as she commented on the Hong Kong protests on a social media platform called Weibo.

The actress said, “I support the Hong Kong police. You can all attack me now.” She added, in English, “What a shame for Hong Kong,” which sparked the social media hashtag #BoycottMulan. Disney was also under fire for filming in infamous Xinjiang, known to keep over 1 million Uighurs in camps that strip them of their human rights.

As for the film itself, I have not seen it because Disney+ requires an extra charge to buy the film. Many here at The Shoemaker Bugle felt that it was simply not worth it to buy Mulan after already having to purchase the Disney+ service. However, according to Rotten Tomatoes, reviewers generally felt that the film was average, at best. It has a score of 74%, which means that about one in every four reviews calls the film a failure. Besides the professional critics, audiences rate the film even more poorly, with just a 50% approval rating on the website.

A writer for Rolling Stone Magazine named K. Austin Collins notes that there are some good parts to Mulan, but they don’t add up to make a quality whole. He wrote,

“Its cast, its attitude, its overall eagerness to please… don’t add up as a good movie. They add up to a blueprint of the movie this ought to be.”

-Rolling Stone Magazine

I think Mr. Collins’ review is a good summary to back up my case that it would be better to wait for Mulan until after Disney+ takes away the paywall and just adds it to the collection of movies that you can already watch with a paid subscription.

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