Tag Archives: JGHS

Small Clubs Spotlight

By Stany Hernandez

Over the years, many clubs have been dead, founded, and revived, here are some of the most recent that we believe deserve more attention:

1) Key Club

Key Club is an international volunteering organization with many social aspects involved. It serves on a club, division, district, and international level, providing many opportunities to network and build connections outside of high school (neighboring clubs are grouped into divisions and districts are combinations of states, further divided into regions). In 2019, the club was revived after being dormant for a couple of years by a senior named Vidal Reynoso; it had 7-10 members in its start, mainly composed of younger siblings who were freshman and friends who hung out in the same social groups.

He started it as a way for students to do “real volunteer work” in a way that was impactful and non-exclusive. During the 2020 term, the same group remained after the two seniors had left. It was during this time that we established a division presence and became more active on a district level through underclassmen representation. Last year, now-senior Javier Reynoso served as their president increasing member participation, improving organization and framework within the club, and setting resources for the leaders to come. His term was revolutionary for the club, marking a great change within Key Club, and establishing a district presence while creating a name for itself on campus.

Due to his work, we were able to double membership to 23 dues-paid members and increase Fall Rally South attendance. Some of our most popular events include: Fall Rally South where we go to Six Flags all day and have a giant spirit battle between five other divisions, and Rose Parade Float Decorating, where we help with flower cutting and scaffolding to decorate the Key Club, Kiwanis, and Lions Club floats.

Key Club Members in 2022

2) Anime Club

Anime Club was founded in 2019 by a senior named Jose Cervantes to discuss anime titles and host watch parties during lunch meetings. The pandemic would mean a pause in the club’s history, as there was no one to take over or get it started again during a hectic time. Last year, the club was taken over by AMP’s very own Logan Torres, hosting meetings every Friday in Mr. Barr’s room as soon as he agreed to be the club advisor. Unfortunately, many of the members involved in the club went to other schools, causing the club to disband.

3) Debate Club

Debate Club was founded in 2020 by myself during my sophomore year. The club was founded in response to the controversial summer that year in which the Black Lives Matter movement was in full swing, and many controversial social & political topics were being brought to light. I felt it was important for students to have a voice and have discussions with their peers about issues which they found passionate, so my co-founder, Valery Montinola , thought it would work well as a Debate Club. Our club only had 7 members in its first and ultimately last year. We tried starting it last year, however, we had low member turnout, resulting in its disolution. As of now, we have no advisor, as our old advisor left this school year to become an administrator at Benton Middle School. We are incredibly happy for her, but we have not found an advisor since.

If any of these clubs intrigue you and seem like something you would want to revive, I would suggest talking to their original advisors, current presidents, or founders. Clubs are an essential part of the high school experience and look great on your college applications, however, they do take time to start up, so if you also want to support your fellow peers by helping with that process, I suggest you start with the clubs on this list.

Your New Year’s Resolutions

The Shoemaker Bugle sent out a survey to ask our readers for their New Year’s Resolutions. Here were the best responses:

To gain 100 subscribers on YouTube.

Anonymous

• To graduate high school
• Stay consistent with my work
• Take a break from my stresses


I want to become buff and have the physique of a body builder.

To be honest, my New Year’s resolution is to focus more on myself than on what others think of me.

JGHS Student

“My New Year’s resolutions are to learn a new skill or hobby, spend less money, and do a random act of kindness.”

–Halie Ambriz


“Just to graduate, man. I’m done with school!”

-Anonymous

What are your New Year’s Resolutions? Let us know in the comments section below. Happy new year, Bugle readers!

Student Voices: How Was the First Semester? 

By Genesis Garcia-Rizo

The Shoemaker Bugle went around campus asking fellow John Glenn and Southeast students about how their first semester has been. Here are some responds we’ve gathered:

Jonathan Sanchez: I can’t say that the semester has been so great as I planned. It has been rough from the beginning since I missed a week and got behind a bit. 

Anonymous Senior: The semester has been pretty average for me, but that is because most of my classes aren’t that bad. If I had to say anything, Homecoming was fun, but I do feel like the semester has gone by fast. I have also felt a little bit of senioritis as well when it comes to some of my work. I haven’t been giving it my full effort, but not to the extent where my grades drop below an A.

Karen Lopez: The semester has been very hard when understanding some concepts in class. But it has been very fun, which makes it worth the struggle. 

Erick Estrada: First semester has been quite physically and mentally demanding. Whether it be from homework or events outside of school, getting 2-6 hours of sleep a day, or trying to apply to as many UCs and Cal States or scholarships as possible, it has been quite the challenge; but I know it’ll be well worth it when I’m finally done.

Angel Bautista: This semester has been difficult in some classes and easier in others, but I’ve been able to turn in almost all of my assignments. I didn’t put as much effort into this semester as others.

Katherine Magana: This semester my classes have been more difficult but I learned how to manage my time better. I struggled in the beginning but I learned how to manage school better with a positive mindset.


Every student has had a different experience of their first semester whether it managing their time, understanding different concepts in class or submitting their college applications. Even through all the struggles, we encourage each student to always keep trying.

Shoemaker Bugle is very thankful to the students who gave their input to make this article. We wish both John Glenn and Southeast students to keep striving for excellence in the second semester!

Opinion: Unprepared ASB Not Representing Our Students

By Stany Hernandez

From the start of the school year, many students at John Glenn High School feel that ASB hasn’t done their job very well.

The issues of timeliness and preparedness are things that turn off students from participating. When things are poorly planned, it gives the students the impression that other school events will be just as bad, despite ASB’s best efforts. It leads students to believe that the school has nothing good to offer, making school spirit drop in the process. We deserve to have a student government that represents what we want and creates the best high school experience for us possible to make us proud to be John Glenn Eagles.

However, this responsibility does not solely lie with ASB, but rather the students as well. ASB needs help and they can’t do it alone. Students don’t want to be involved, yet still seem to blame ASB when they don’t have any fun. You can’t call something “cringe” or “wack” when you don’t even give yourself a chance to enjoy it. We’re allowed to do silly, dumb things, even if others may judge us. As long as you’re having fun, it’s always worth it.

If you feel school spirit is dropping, do something about it. We have so many programs and activities that have the potential to expand your view of this school besides being “boring.” Spirit comes from all of us, and you play a part–even in your indifference.

School spirit is one of the things our campus most struggles with. Although it has become normal for students to not participate in school activities, it is incredibly alarming how little people care. Arguably, the biggest part of ASB is to improve and promote the school spirit, so when students have the lowest opinion of school that we’ve ever seen, there should be sirens going off that there’s something to be fixed, and frankly ASB is not responding well. When there is poor execution, the end results are bound to be less than what is expected. People want to get involved, improve on school spirit, if and when ASB plans events thoroughly, in a timely manner. Many students want to get involved and improve school spirit, but ASB needs to plan events more thoroughly to allow them to build on it. 

We first saw this lack of planning play out in the coordination of the “Senior Sunrise.” If you aren’t a senior, perhaps you aren’t aware of what happened during the event. Students watched the sunrise from the gates of the schools because nobody was there to open them up, and once somebody was there, we sat silently on the field waiting for the sun to fully come up. There was no music, no posters until everybody had left, and food wasn’t provided until much later. One student remarked, “Senior sunrise was … okay. It wasn’t really anything special.”

Shouldn’t it have been special? While it wouldn’t necessarily be something that ASB needs to go all out for, it still would have elevated the first senior experience of the year and made it memorable, if there had been more preparation. Instead, it left a poor first impression of ASB on this year’s seniors.

Homecoming events also experienced poor planning, as key figures were informed of things at the very last minute. When it comes to homecoming royalty, the changing of the previous process has been viewed as unnecessary. Instead of being inclusive, the new process has scared many underclassmen from running in future years. ASB tried to fix something that wasn’t broken, and many members of ASB also felt that it wasn’t a necessary change.

For the majority of the candidates’ campaigning, they were kept in the dark as to when voting took place, or many other details regarding the event. We were made aware of the existence of a pep rally the day before it was set to happen and of our placement on the football field (in a message sent to the entire student body, we were told to meet in the ASB room during first period). Teachers were not informed of a Friday pep rally until the morning of the event, and many were confused about the day’s schedule, which also included an earthquake drill. Previous homecoming court candidates were at least given a rough outline of what to expect through the application process, voting, and rallies and events, and it seemed that more teachers and adults were aware of the information well ahead of time.

None of this is to undermine the efforts of the ASB students creating countless posters for the quad and to decorate at football games. It is also important to highlight ASB’s struggles because of the pandemic. Last year, there were a lot of COVID restrictions, so we couldn’t obtain the full experience our school has to offer because of it. A faculty member reflected on this point, saying, “ASB has faced tremendous difficulties this year so I feel that considering those difficulties, they are performing admirably.” The faculty member also mentioned that, “The last few years have been extremely difficult–not just for students and staff but also for clubs and organizations. It definitely takes a while to get back into the swing of things. I think they’re doing the best they absolutely can. I think we’re seeing some of those rewards, but also there’s room for growth.” ASB is dealing with a lot of changes and struggles, of which we could be of service to. 

Possible solutions to ASB’s issues that would soften the harsh perspective that students have on them (if they accept our constructive criticisms and concerns) include the following: One solution would be to simply plan things a month or a month and a half ahead of time. This is just to account for any hiccups that may be encountered and to get ahead of any issues as they arise. Schoolwide events should have at least a week’s notice, but normally we would like to have a two-week’s notice. A good rule of thumb for big events is to assume that everything that can go wrong, will go wrong. Think of any possible question about the event and figure out possible solutions ahead of time, so you have all the answers and nobody is left confused.

Another suggestion would be to ask for student opinions or feedback regularly. We should encourage a place where students can submit their quarrels or requests about events they think could be enjoyed by the student body. Members of ASB should be known and recognized so people could know where to direct their questions and input to, but a form or anonymous feedback box would keep things organized.

The senior class has been the only ones to experience an ASB that hasn’t been impacted the entire term due to COVID, and we should be the ones to give that experience back to the underclassmen. I implore this senior class of 2023, especially, to get involved and keep these Eagle traditions alive. Anyone who feels especially spirited and wants to help towards this effort should join ASB or become a class senator and do what you can towards this effort. ASB will never have too many people, so consider joining and talk to Mrs. Cruz in room 704.

Homecoming Dance 2022: Destination Homecoming

By Adriana Zaragoza

Last Friday, October 21, was John Glenn High School’s first 2022-2023 school dance, the annual Homecoming Dance that took place the day after the Homecoming Game vs Artesia High School.

Homecoming Queen for 2022 is Stany Hernandez and the Homecoming King is Manny Sigala.

Let me just say, it was definitely a dance to remember. The dance was themed “Destination” and was held at our own football stadium. There were multiple photo opportunities featuring backdrops from different exotic areas around the world. We were also served dinner, had a professional photo booth, a henna artist, and an open area for outside games and dancing.

Let’s start with the photo opportunities. The photobooth was super fun, you got three poses and two printed-out pictures. I believe the only downside was the lag in the camera, causing some pictures to mess up, which some students were upset about. Besides that, all the photo areas were super cute!

We were served tacos for dinner, offering full plates and even sides. Overall the food was a 6/10. Although super filling and various options were served, many students mentioned the temperature of the food being slightly cold, and not having an authentic taco taste. Dessert was also provided, and gone SUPER QUICKLY. There were different cupcakes and some brownies. Lastly, the drinks served were adequate. We felt we could’ve used some more options. 

Now I don’t have much to say on the henna artist provided. Not only was the line incredibly long to get henna, many people were unsatisfied with the fact that the henna designs only lasted that night, fading after less than 24 hours.

The outside games, and especially the dancing made the night, however. The DJ took a little while to get used to, since she wasn’t really taking our requests or playing any banda, Spanish, or corridos, and MANY students wanted Latin music. Once we got comfortable, everyone got into it. All students from every grade level were dancing, dance circles were made, and some seniors even started the snake around the stadium. Special shout out to seniors Pablo Acosta, Edgar Medel, Cristian Mendez, Ismael Alberto, Giovanni Martinez, and Andrew Donis for getting the party started! Overall, it was a great night that brought us all together. I’ve never seen so much school spirit.

Opinion: New Pick-Up System at Glenn is Confusing

By Em Holy

At the beginning of the school year, John Glenn High School input a new pickup system and many people have found it confusing and unnecessary. 

This new system was a sudden change that almost no one was informed of prior to  the change. Many parents were only made aware as they arrived to pick up their kids, but almost none of the student body was told.

Many parents and children were left confused at the end of the day. Some people couldn’t find their parents and were left wandering around the parking lot. This also caused a lot of traffic because no one knew the correct place to go.

This lack of communication with the student body and parents was definitely a failure on the faculty’s behalf, but many feel like the entire situation was completely unnecessary and preventable.

A student, Moth Vera said, “There’s other things the school should be worrying about, there was nothing wrong with the pickup system.”

Another concerned parent also said, “I don’t see how it makes anything safer or better, and not everyone follows the system.”

The general consensus is that this change was unnecessary, it wasn’t broken, so why fix it? It shows a level of organization within the school’s problems and priorities. There are bigger issues concerning the school and its students. The school should take more time to look into maybe changing other things would be more beneficial to all students.

ed. note: Below is the information that was shared to our Eagle parents and families in early September:


Please be reminded of the important changes to our Pick-Up procedures:

Your child’s SAFETY is our priority. To avoid the danger caused by congestion near the crosswalk and the front of the school, we are asking that you adhere to the new guidelines for after school pick-up. Our goal is to keep everyone safe, especially our Eagles and Bulldogs, and we thank you for following the guidelines below beginning Tuesday, September 6th.

PICK-UP (After School)

Students who…

  • Walk to School: Exit Gate 4.
  • Ride the School Bus: Exit Gate 4.
  • Are picked up in a car by a parent/guardian: Exit Gate 1 (by the gym).

Parents/Guardians please….

  • ENTER the first gate by the tennis courts off of Shoemaker Ave.
  • Use the turn-around to pick up your child by Gate #1
  • Exit through the gate by the MPR
  • At no time, should a driver be:
    • parked any red zone(s)
    • double parked anywhere on Shoemaker or Foster
    • parked in the middle of the street
    • Waiting in the front parking lot where the busses pick up
    • Crossing a double-yellow line to make a u-turn
  • Be mindful of the crosswalks on Shoemaker and Foster
  • Slow down for crossers
  • Do not enter the Staff Parking Lot

Opinion: Restrooms Make Students Uncomfortable

By Jacob Gonzalez

Students at John Glenn High School are disgusted and uncomfortable with their student restrooms. On a normal day at school, students sometimes need to go to the restroom. The problem with it is that they don’t even feel comfortable doing so. The school restrooms are something you can’t even describe.

It is gross for the boys’ restroom when there is trash everywhere and graffiti on the walls. The restrooms are too small and all the stalls feel so small. When inside a stall there’s often no toilet paper, and the toilet paper that is used is so cheap it’s too delicate for use.

For the womens’ restroom it is also similar. I’ve interviewed a couple of female students and they’ve told me that it is sometimes so gross that they can’t even do their business. Girls say that there are hygiene products on the floor or even on the toilet.

I interviewed a student whose name is Mikalya. She is a 12th grader here at Glenn and she also agrees with my opinion. She thinks that the school restrooms need to be open more often and there should be more trash cans in the bathroom area. Students would say they would use the office restroom because there is privacy and that it is cleaner and just better in general.

With the restrooms we are given, it isn’t that the janitors don’t clean it right. The janitors here are great; they do their job as best as they can. Rather, it is we the students who don’t take care of our restrooms. It is disappointing that there are some of us that are more mature than others. It isn’t hard to be clean and respectful to our restrooms. We the students should keep our stalls clean and pick up after ourselves.

The Difference Attendance Makes at JGHS

By Cesar Martinez

Over the years, John Glenn High School has dropped in overall students & transfers, while tardiness and absences have increased. Just last year, there were a total of 991 students enrolled, but we currently have only 861 students. This is a 130 student drop.

There has been a trend in the past few years of absences and tardies. The amount of students that are tardy to classes have increased a lot since last year. This year, only 2 or 3 students have been sent to El Camino (continuation high school) because they are crowded with students from other campuses. The only thing that has stayed level is the overall transfers to other schools.

A big consequence of student attendance dropping is the school doesn’t get as much funding as before, which ends up forcing the school to cut teachers, courses, and programs. So, students aren’t the only thing that have decreased over the years– teachers have also been laid off, or they were forced to transfer to another school or district. For example, as recently as the 2017-2018 school year, there were nine English teachers; however, because of attendance droppage, today there are only four English teachers.

One way for us to stop students and teachers from leaving Glenn is to reach out to the community and show them why they should come to Glenn more than anywhere else, like Norwalk High or another district. Students should care about better enrollment and attendance because we will get more funding for the school, which means we will have more activities and more school attraction. With more students attending, we could offer courses that other schools have, like culinary arts, wood shop, automotive classes, more music, drama, and art choices, and further pathways that would benefit students in their lives. Sports would also be more competitive, which also brings in more money.

JGHS Blood Drive

By Daniela Galindo 

JGHS’ blood drive was a success, with almost 70 students donating blood. It would not have been possible without the Red Cross nurses and volunteers from CSF and AVID club. While students and staff waited for their turn to donate, they were given some snacks, including juice/milk, croissants, fruits, granola bars, and more. To make the students feel less anxious, calm music was playing, and they were well taken care of by nurses. They were also gifted a shirt when they donated.

 “It’s a good thing students are donating” says Daniela Reyna, one of the volunteers that made this possible. She is a student from Vanguard University where she is studying nursing, and she is grateful for the students from JGHS who donated because every day she sees how patients constantly need the blood. Just knowing and seeing those who donated she feels relieved.

CSF Advisor and ELA instructor Mrs. Cynthia Johnson added that she feels proud seeing her students donating. “It’s a great thing; you never know when you need it.” She also added the fact that, “One pint of blood can save 3 lives!” It sure was helpful having those students donate.

I talked with a junior named Stany Hernandez, who said, “If you get a chance, do it. And do it because it comes from the heart.” Jessica Gomez, who is a senior, told me how she felt towards this situation, proceeding to say, “It’s really good because after the pandemic more people need it. It’s so good students are doing this. When there’s an opportunity, take it.”

I couldn’t agree more with my fellow classmates. Students are saving lives and they probably don’t even know. If you didn’t have the opportunity to donate, in March 2022 we will be having our next blood drive.

Eagles Football Ends on a High Note

By Pedro Torres

John Glenn High School played their last football game of the 2021 season on Friday, October 29 against the Pioneer High School Titans and came home victorious by a final score of 31-26, ending the season on a high note.

One of the two major highlights of the first quarter was when John Glenn kick returner Manny Sigala scored on a kickoff return, running 99 yards for a touchdown! Then, minutes later, Iona Young capped off a 62-yard drive with a touchdown run, tying the score at 13-13. Fans were in for a good game as John Glenn and Pioneer were neck and neck when the first quarter came to a close.

During the second quarter, the Eagles were close to defeat. Pioneer had scored two touchdowns, pushing their lead to 26-13. All of a sudden, senior athlete Richard Ramos returned an interception and scored a touchdown, bringing the Eagles to within a touchdown at 26-19 at halftime.

The biggest play, however, finally came when junior Mikel Udengwu returned an interception 77-yards for a touchdown, his pick-6 bringing the Eagles to within one at 26-25, leaving the crowd on their toes.

The Eagles and Titans were head to head, but Pioneer had the lead by one point. During the final minutes of the fourth quarter, senior quarterback Natanael Jacobo scored the final touchdown after an 80-yard drive making the comeback complete. After a couple of key defensive stops, the Eagles secured the win for John Glenn High School at 31-26, improving their overall record to 3-7, and finishing in third place in the 605 League with a 1-2 record behind league champions Cerritos (3-0; 5-6 overall) and Artesia High (2-1; 2-9 overall).

« Older Entries