Category Archives: Opinion

Opinions On Being Back In School 

By Martin Gonzalez & Christian Bernal

Being back in school may be a difficult transition from distance learning, we wanted to know the opinions on how students feel about being back in school. A survey was given to students to see how they felt about the transition. They were asked if they had felt comfortable being back in school and the results were 57.6% of the students who took the survey said that they do feel comfortable to be back in school, 36.4% of the students say that they kinda feel comfortable to back in school and 6% of the students said that they do not feel comfortable at all.

We had felt that maybe students are having a tough transition being back in school, so we wanted to see if being back in school was more difficult than online learning. The majority of the students had said that being back in school is easier than online learning because they are able to receive better help through face to face assistance and not just through a computer. The rest of the students say that it is more difficult because since we go to a military school we have more responsibilities than a regular student would have, students say that it was easier and because it was not as stressful to be in online learning then in person learning.

Being in online learning did separate a lot of students from their friends because not being able to see each other. The students were asked how they felt about returning to school and seeing their friends. Majority of the students had said that they were excited to be reunited with their friends and to be able to talk face to face, 24.3% of the students said that they were on the fence about it, and 12.5% said that they weren’t excited at all to see their friends. Being on distance learning was very different from in person learning because the student didn’t have that face to face help that they can receive back in school. The students were asked which subject is the most difficult in person learning then from online learning. The majority of them responded that math was the hardest subject with the runner up being language arts. Students have a difficult time right now because they have to transition back into school and have to struggle with subjects that felt so different from online learning to in person learning.

Being back in school with masks, 55% of the students say that they don’t like wearing masks but they understand why they have to wear them. 32.5% of the students say that they like wearing masks in school. 12.6% of students say that they hate wearing masks in school. In addition to that, almost all of the students are saying that it’s easier being back to school than doing online learning because they don’t have to worry about wifi issues and sleeping, and about 82.4% say that they would rather be back in person compared to the 17.6% that they would rather be back in distance learning.

Opinion: Problems with P.T. Field at SEA

By Rigo Macias and Daniel Espinoza

What does privilege mean to you? Southeast Academy has a lot of problems on the campus and it includes a lot of items that need to be remodeled and it doesn’t get the attention that it deserves. We have been given hand-me-downs while the district helps out other schools, allowing them to get new items every year. Where are the resources for SEA? Southeast Academy has not been remodeled, which it badly needs and students are also getting injured every year because of the numerous holes in the grass. John Glenn just got a new field and it made their campus look very impressive, while Southeast hasn’t gotten anything from the district. We need a new field because so many cadets have gotten injured and we don’t have a voice here because the district never listens and this needs to change. Student voices matter. The following are a few comments about this issue that were brave enough to speak up.

These are some of the questions asked of Cadets and their thoughts about our P.T. Field: 

  1.  Do you feel safe running on the grass at P.T.? 

Cadet Martin Gonzalez: “I don’t feel safe at all when I run on the field at P.T. and I’m constantly looking out for holes in the grass worried about rolling my ankle. This is not fair because John Glenn never has to worry about the issue.”

  1. Do you have any likes or dislikes about P.T.? 

Cadet Bernal: “I am very motivated to workout because the workouts are very intense and I learned through the challenging workouts how to push myself to my limit and not give up.”

  1. Have you or someone you know at Southeast Academy gotten injured while running on the field at P.T.? 

Cadet 2nd Class Bandera : “Yes. When we were running a mile for the PT test, Cadet Macia and I were running together. His ankle got stuck in a hole and he rolled it. Luckily everything was okay.”

  1. How challenging are the workouts at P.T.? 

Cadet Johnny Quezada: “PT has been really challenging but it is getting easy day by day for me and I want to get in shape.” 

  1. Do you have any solutions to fix the problems at Southeast? 

Anonymous: “Funding from the district so we can make our school look very appealing.” 

  1. Should we be required to work out in the P.T. field?    

Anonymous: “If safe, yes. I’m just a little frustrated that cadets at Southeast Academy keep on rolling their ankles constantly and I just want to stop worrying about it and hopefully the district comes up with a solution soon. “

We are not asking for a lot, just what we know that we deserve. Students shouldn’t have to worry about possible injuries they could sustain while exercising. Southeast students have enough on their plates as it is. We need this problem addressed. It’s the right thing to do.

Red Ants, Potholes, and No Water Fountains. . . OH MY!

By Naidy Cuardras & Betsy Carranza

For the past years, Southeast Academy has had many issues that should be taken into consideration. We do physical training for less than an hour around 4-5 days a week. Discipline is something that many students learn here, however due to the presence of red ants and potholes in our field, this has recently become a health and safety concern. Many students have been injured as a result of these red ants and potholes. Potholes cause cadets to trip and twist their ankles, while red ants inflict severe discomfort and burning (itchiness). Mrs. Johnson, a math and Physical training teacher at Southeast Academy, said “It’s horrendous. This issue has been brought up by the school faculty and nothing has been done. We’re not asking for a big football field… just a track. That way they have a clear path that won’t cause any injuries. ” Ms. J has been out there herself and has avoided going out since, mostly due to the swarm of red ants that will bite her again. Melody Castro, a Southeast Academy junior, is one among the numerous kids that has been injured in the grass area.

Blog - Why Are Ant Hills Already Forming In My Yard?

At Southeast Academy High school we are constantly staying hydrated. In fact, it is a part of our uniform to bring water bottles with us. When it comes to P.T. (physical training), Southeast cadets are always on their feet. The majority of the time, students finish their water bottles and have to constantly refill them.  Yes, there are drinking fountains, but do they actually help? When we look at our fountain stations, we can see that half of them don’t function, and the water doesn’t come out. In this school, a water filter would be quite useful because the water supply is inequitable for Southeast Academy cadets. Staying hydrated and having to complete P.T. without water is a risk, since dehydration may lead to many cadets passing out. The fountain itself is likely covered in germs, in addition, the tap water could likely become polluted with chemicals and bacteria. The more individuals who come in contact with the fountain, the more contaminated it becomes. With a water dispenser, we would just place a water bottle on the dispenser and water would flow. 

As a cadet at Southeast, I feel that we should have a change similar to what John Glenn has surrounding its football field. We hope to create little but meaningful improvements, not just for ourselves, but also for future Southeast Academy High School cadets. WE WANT THINGS TO BE DIFFERENT! It is not fair for any student to have an unsafe environment at school. Some schools get more of what they need for students, while others are left with less resources. Isn’t it true that we’re all one and the same?

Opinion: Stop Fighting on Campus

By April Zavala

As we all know, John Glenn High School had a rough start to the 2021-2022 school year. By the second week of school there were approximately five altercations on campus. It saddens me, as this is not the reputation a student should want for their school. Every physical altercation that occurs on school grounds has to be reported to the district office, who keep strict records and keep track of our school’s positive and negative attributes on a dashboard and on things like the WASC Report.

This will ultimately reflect poorly on the community. Is this the reputation you want for your community? Sure, many of you could seemingly care less about our school’s reputation, but we need to acknowledge that our peers are working hard for their education. For many who plan on going to College or University, the reputation of our school is extremely important. It is not fair for those who worked exceptionally hard all four years of high school to build a good name for not only themselves, but for John Glenn, just for someone to ruin it with their careless actions. Distractions like these make it hard for us to feel motivated and want to continue to attend school when these fights continuously occur. 

Something we must keep in mind are the responsibilities we hold as students. We are here to learn. We are not here to start problems with one another. Sometimes, we can’t control who we like or who we don’t like, nor can we control who likes or dislikes us. What we can control is how we handle these situations. Since we will all be going out into the real world in a few years, we must learn to handle things maturely. This could be as easy as being the bigger person and letting the situation go, or you could even talk things out.

Here are some things you can keep in mind: when someone makes you mad or upset, it is hard to look them in the eye, and I understand the feeling of wanting to take that anger out on them, but something that helps is giving yourself time away from that person. If they continue to talk about you or do you wrong, be the bigger person and ignore them.

Once it gets to the point where you feel that you can’t control your anger much longer, try talking to someone. Our counselors here at John Glenn are great people to vent to about any situation you find yourself in. If you don’t feel comfortable speaking to your counselor, try talking to a friend, a family member, or even your favorite teacher.

Something we must take home with us at the end of the day is, we are almost adults, and it is important we start acting more maturely and with responsibility. Because remember, once you turn 18, fighting is a crime. We must not allow fighting to become a comfortable solution to minor inconveniences.

Should colleges require students to be vaccinated?

By Monse Juarez

The decision has been made by several colleges and universities across the country: students will be required to get the Covid-19 vaccine. Some exemptions from this requirement include religious and medical reasons. Aside from the exemptions, there has been pushback by Republicans and even from parents of students. However, the majority of students have not tried to fight the decision at which colleges have arrived. It is clear that different groups have formed their own opinions about the Covid-19 vaccine, however the real question is: Should colleges require students to be vaccinated?

To answer this question, society must first consider if it is actually legal for colleges to set this requirement. According to Harvard Law Professor, Glenn Cohen, colleges aren’t exactly breaking any laws. On the other hand, there aren’t any laws that explicitly say it is allowed. The Covid-19 vaccination roll-out for college students has been controversial for this very reason. The law doesn’t explicitly forbid or allow college institutions from setting vaccination requirements. In reality, the pushback comes from individual states that have decided to ban Covid-19 regulations like masks and vaccinations.

Clearly, Covid-19 vaccinations are needed to make sure that people are safe. So in reality the Covid-19 vaccination requirement that has been implemented by several colleges across the country, is not exactly illegal. Some colleges already require that students receive flu shots, and all public schools require vaccinations for things like MMR and chickenpox. So the Covid-19 vaccination requirement is actually not as far-fetched as some may believe.

Asian-American Hate Crimes a Step Backward

By Edmund Shryock

As the pandemic ruined summer plans and normal schedules, for some people it fueled a hate against Asain-Americans causing violence to spring up around the country. This is a major step back from the progress that Americans made in breaking down the racial barriers in the last 60 years. 

After the attacks on Pearl Harbor in 1941, America declared war on Japan, officially entering the United States in WWII. However, war with Japan created hatred towards Asian-Americans as the U.S population believed that they were spies. This led to President Roosevelt signing into action Executive Order 9066 which forced hundreds of Japanese-Americans to be sent to internment camps even though most were American Citizens. 

In 2020 the whole world came to a stop due to the Coronavirus Pandemic. As scientists tracked the location to where the pandemic started, they found out that it originated from China. This gave birth to conspiracy theories on how the virus started causing numerous Americans to have anger towards Asian-Americans believing they were the main cause. These tensions were only escalated when then-President Donald Trump would use terms such as the “Kung Flu” and “China virus” when referencing the Coronavirus.

Now with Joe Biden as President, he has now faced the issue of Asian-American hate spreading across the country. Los Angeles Times staff writer Leila Miller reported that, “The Los Angeles Police Department documented 15 hate crimes against Asian Americans in 2020, more than double the previous year, according to a new study by the agency.” This goes to show the destruction caused by hatred and stupidity. (picture via)

In my opinion, I believe that the only way to stop the racial hate and unite this country is to educate each other and actually discuss our differences. American musician Daryl Davis put it best in my opinion: “There’s a difference between being ignorant and being stupid… For me, an ignorant person is someone who makes the wrong decision or a bad choice because he or she does not have the proper facts. If you give that person the facts and the proper information you have alleviated that ignorance, and they make the right decision.” Through this education process we can unite and look past race and skin color as a whole, making the world safer for generations to come.

The Problems with the 93rd Academy Awards

By Angelica Moreno

The 93rd Academy Awards show, ‘The Oscars,’ took place on Sunday, April 25. Now that we have our story’s basics aside, there are some things I’d like to say about this year’s Oscar winners.

I am a ‘quickly fixated’ and ‘prone to micro obsessions’ type of person. Once I like something, I love it and when I hate something, I just hate it. So when I got the final and complete list of Oscar winners, I was taken back. Why didn’t any of my favorite movies get awarded?

The movies I hoped to get awarded were: The Trial of the Chicago 7, Promising Young Woman and (shamefully mumbles under her breath) Borat Subsequent Moviefilm. An odd trio, but I’m not at my peak of pretentiousness to have picked the other movies to love, yet. I waited 364 days for this very award show and didn’t get exactly what I wanted. Wow; just wow. It’s like they don’t even know that I exist– because they don’t.

After a few minutes of sitting on this year’s winner list, (because I keep my phone in my back pocket) it all made sense why each movie got the award they got. All respect to The Trial of the Chicago 7 (below), but I guess they had their field day at The Golden Globes. You’ll get them next time, Aaron Sorkin.

Our most hated winner of the night was Anthony Hopkins for best actor in The Father (below). I didn’t hate it initially but the manipulative buildup of the show to have the viewers and audience think the late Chadwick Boseman would win for the big bang of an outro (and that did not happen), did rile some people up. To be fair, the director of the Academy Awards broadcast, Steven Soderbergh, came out to say he did not know who would win. He just directs the show to go smoothly, and that’s all. He made the personal choice to switch best actor to be last announced in case of Chadwick Boseman winning. You are absolved of your sin, Steven Soderbergh, but only from me personally. You made a lot of people mad.

Movie of the night Nomadland won major categories including best picture, best actress, and best director (pictured below). It is an Oscar-worthy movie but was it even a great movie? The Academy, people who vote for the winners, would go on the route to choose this. It has everything a pretentious person needs–minutes of no dialogue and taking in the environment, substantial acting for the part, only three good lines of dialogue that are #deep. Even with a lesson at the end of every movie, pretentious films feel like they barely had a lesson. It’s not pretentious enough, if I knew what it was about. Maybe I’m confusing pretentious with arthouse but they’re in the same ballpark.

There are many factors as to why Nomadland was the ‘movie of the night,’ but the part that strikes me dirty is the uplift and spotlight that Amazon Prime received. Jeff Bezos got free promotion in best picture Nomadland and that just makes me think someone high ranking in the Academy got paid to skew the votes to promote capitalist propaganda to us. Nomadland dashingly enlightened the idea of Amazon being a good thing in society (as if Jeff Bezos has created the perfect working environment and the gap between us and the top 1% isnt getting bigger by the day). All respect to Nomadland though–with art comes capitalism planted propaganda.

With the pandemic, not every movie got to be made and or released but every other category of the award show gave me the reaction of “Eh, that makes sense.” A big win for Promising Young Woman (original screenplay) that didn’t get recognition all award season other than many nominees and Minari (actress in supporting role) for bringing new talent into the spotlight (pictured below).

Daniel Kaluuya and Lakeith Stanfield from Judas and the Black Messiah (pictured below) continue to go under-appreciated for their talents but their time will come. The film was nominated for best picture and best supporting actor, but did win best original song.

That’s all I want to say about this year’s Oscars with the lesson being: always be cautious of the media you digest because sometimes it just might be American-powered propaganda.

Return to School Opinion: What Choice Would You Make?

by Eliza Rodrigueza

School is a big part of a student’s life and it will prepare them for adulthood, but since 2020 students have been in distant learning and taking classes over Zoom. If given the option to go back on campus, I wanted to see what the students would choose, so I created a Google survey and asked students to participate. 

My question was simple, If high schools were to open again and you were given two options to choose from: (1) going back on campus, or, (2) staying home and continuing to do distance learning, which one would you choose?

Out of the fifty students who responded to the survey, the results were pretty close. 52% said they would opt to return to campus while 48% stated they would remain home.

When asked about her choice to continue distance learning, Cadet Paula Huerta stated,  

“I personally do not think it is safe enough to go back. My dad is very prone to getting sick and it could be very risky. The vaccine is out but it doesn’t mean it is a cure.”

Personally, I agree with what Huerta has said because it is not yet safe to go back to school even if the vaccine has been released.

Cadet second class Briana Guvara shared that, “Yes I would go back on campus because distance learning is very distracting.”

Staff Sergeant Mia Martinez states, “I would like to go back on campus because I need to get out of the house. And because I miss seeing my friends even if we are conversing from 6 feet apart.” It’s easy to understand that students miss seeing their friends. 

Those wanting to return to school have valid reasons. The distractions at home can really get in the way of learning, and all of us miss socializing with friends. 

What to Consider?

In January, Harvard Health Publishing released information on the Coronavirus Outbreak, and it stated that younger kids can get COVID-19 too. 

Still, Norwalk-La Mirada Unified School District just reopened elementary schools beginning Monday, March 29th. But unfortunately, there has been no vaccine released for younger children under the age of 16.

Therefore, I don’t believe that it is safe to send them back to school; younger kids are very naive, and they do not always listen to what adults tell them to do. They may not wear their masks. They may share them with friends.  If it is not safe for high school students, why would they send little kids to go back to school? 

Just because a vaccine was released there are still many possibilities where it can go wrong and turn out for the worst. 

UC Davis and WebMD both published articles that share why many people are still hesitant to take the vaccine.

The decision about whether or not it is safe and advisable to return to school remains quite controversial. 

If you were given the option, which would you choose? Sound off in our comments section.

A Review of President Biden’s First 3 Months

By Edmund Shryock, Political Correspondent

Starting in the month of March, President Biden’s administration has achieved a major breakthrough, providing relief to the millions of Americans who need it. Through Congress, Joe Biden’s $1.9 trillion dollar Coronavirus Relief Bill was passed. This however, came with strong objections from the Republicans. Through the passing of this bill, almost every tax-paying American will receive a $1,400 stimulus check. Finally, with the steady decline in new Coronavirus cases, Joe Biden pushes for a nationwide school re-opening plan.

In the month of February, Biden increased the number of vaccine doses that were being shipped across the country, increasing the amount of people getting vaccinated to approximately 2 million people per day. This slowly started to reduce the spread and infection rates. A new vaccine under the company Johnson & Johnson was approved and provided only a one-shot dose. This was backed by President Biden’s strict mask mandates and messages to continue practicing social distancing.

Starting on January 20th, President Biden would set in motion numerous “campaign promised” executive orders, numbering at 17 orders on the first day. These executive orders consisted of addressing the Coronavirus Pandemic head on. An example of this would be the 100-day mask challenge, asking Americans to wear masks for 100 days. Also, continued to pause people having to pay for student loans and federal student loans. Finally, he put a freeze on foreclosures and evictions to March 31.

President Biden’s executive orders on Inauguration Day also reversed a great number of orders that the Trump Administration had previously signed into order. Joe Biden signed for the U.S. to rejoin the Paris Climate Accord and put a halt on withdrawing from the World Health Organization. Biden also lifted Trump’s travel ban on immigrants from predominantly Muslim countries. Finally, he also stopped the construction of the southern border wall, thus removing the national emergency declaration to fund it.

These first 3 months of the Joe Biden Presidency sets the mood for what we can expect from our President for the next 3 years. This also shows how, under Biden, this pandemic will start to diminish thanks to the vaccine roll out. Lastly, it offers hope and help to those all around the world, making the U.S. no longer just “America first” but also more towards our “Allies first.”

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